Hiking Ngong Hills For Kshs. 675

The last time I hiked Ngong Hills was in 2008 during a school trip. I do not remember much about it except how real it felt and the amazing company I had. That is how the hunger to hike Mt. Kenya began 🙂

After a week of planning my friend, Jaydee, and I decided to hike Ngong Hills on Saturday 17th December. The plan was to get there by 9.30 am but we ended up meeting at 11.49 am in Ngong town.

After shopping at Naivas for Kshs. 200, we sought a way to reach the Kenya Forest reserve gate 2 km away. A motorbike was the best option because we did not have a car. We negotiated with the motorbike guy and he took us to the gate for 75 bob each.

We reached the gate about 10 minutes later and paid the entrance fee, 200 bob per person, via M- Pesa. This is the only mode of payment they accept.

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From the gate, it is quite a distance to the start of the hills. We went past the cemented Kengen generator site, the windmill farm, the barb wired homes on the left side and down the rocky path to a Maasai who sells Kenyan jewelry. This is where the hills officially start.

Most people, we noticed, drive up to this point and leave their car. Some, however, drive up until the end of the first hill.

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The first and second hills are relatively easy to climb. They do not have a rocky path and are not steep. In fact, you can set your Leso here and have a small picnic with your friends, family or squad.

The third hill is steep, rocky steep, but shorter than the second hill. This is where the need for comfortable shoes with a good grip is super important. I ended up slipping a lot because my shoes did not have a good grip. By the time we reached the top, we had to sit down and eat something. Better yet, drink something. The hike up can really drain so cookies, fruits, energy bars and liters of water (about 2- 3) are lifesavers.

The way to the fourth hill is sloppy and windy. It is not as windy as the fifth and sixth hills but it can blow your cap away. (It almost blew Jaydee’s)

Unlike the last four hills, the fifth and sixth hills are bushy with a lot of grass. Because of this, bulls and cows graze here and you can hear a tinkling of bells as they come down or go up.

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Being the curious person Jaydee is, when we got to the start of the seventh hill (yes seventh, we were so jazzed!); he wanted to know what is on the left side up. We trekked up and just before we got there, we heard some boys shouting at us.

They were quite far and with the wind blowing heavily, we could not hear them clearly. They kept shouting as we went closer so we decided to stop. They got closer and that is when they told us Ndovu’s graze there. We doubted the validity of the story but they seemed so adamant, we did not check it out.

We ended our hike at Kona Baridi, the end of the seventh hill. The place is beautiful and the skyline even more amazing. We did not stay here for long because of the walk back and the time. It was about 4.45 pm when we reached here. On our way back down, we learnt from a couple who we had left behind, you are not supposed to stay past 5 pm. They were almost arrested:-(

Overall, it was an awesome hike and it was definitely worth it. A first time hiker can hack this too 🙂

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Cost Breakdown:

Transport to Ngong town: 50/-

Motorbike to KWS: 75/-

Snacks: 200/-

Entrance fee: 200/-

Motorbike to Ngong Town: 50/-

Ride to Town: 100/-

Total: Kshs. 675 per person.

P.s: Thank you so much to everyone who has  been following this blog, liking, commenting and sharing it too 🙂 I appreciate you guys. Loads of love! Happy holidays!

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10 thoughts on “Hiking Ngong Hills For Kshs. 675

  1. George says:

    I’m a huge fan of mountaineering and have climbed and hiked since I was little. It was a joy to read your post, as it’s a subject that matters to me! Have you climbed Kilimanjaro yet?

    Like

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